WRITERS

2017 Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival

Readers and Writers



Women of Influence

Wednesday September 27 -  5.30pm

Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $18.00



Lizzy Marvelly

Lizzie Marvelly Lizzie is a musician, writer and activist from New Zealand. The winner of two Canon Media Awards this year for her work as an opinion columnist and blogger, she was also named as a finalist in the 2016 New Zealand Women of Influence Awards, and was awarded an Auckland Local Hero Medal in 2016. You may have also recently seen her as a judge in the TVNZ series “The Naked Choir”.
While Lizzie has performed around the world, she has more recently become known as a tireless advocate for young women. In 2015, Lizzie founded the award-winning Villainesse.com, an online media project aiming to create smart, ‘no-filter’ media for young women. Lizzie was motivated to create Villainesse because she wanted to hear more young female voices represented in the media. Later that year, Lizzie launched Villainesse’s first major campaign, the globally successful #MyBodyMyTerms. Aiming to spark conversation about victim-blaming, revenge porn, consent and sexual violence, the #MyBodyMyTerms videos have been viewed over 500,000 times, and received press attention from the Huffington Post, Daily Mail, Buzzfeed US, Cosmopolitan US, Bustle, and the New Zealand Herald, among many others.

Anna Pierard

Raised in Hawkes Bay, music was always the focus for Anna, who was a member of the National Youth Choir and Orchestra, as a violist and singer. She studied singing at Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, where she met her husband Jose Aparicio, a flautist and conductor, and opera at the Royal Conservatoire in Amsterdam.
She has performed at the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Palau de la Musica (Valencia), Teatro Castellar (Castellon, Spain), La Monnaie (Royal Opera House, Belgium), Opera du Rhin (Strasbourg), amongst others. In 2009, she returned to NZ and has performed frequently with NZ Opera, the NZ Symphony Orchestra, APO, CPO and the ACS, as well as performing locally with the Napier Civic Choir.
In 2014, Anna founded Festival Opera and Project Prima Volta, the music programme dedicated to draw teenagers from diverse backgrounds together, to help them find common ground through preparation and performance in a variety of musical styles.



Mental Health

Friday September 29  -  5.30pm

Parlour Projects

Adult   $18.00


Egan Bidois
Egan Bidois has worked over twenty years in the mental health sector in roles from a support worker to a national policy advisor sitting on boards and advisory groups both nationally and internationally. He is a passionate advocate and trainer for consumer focussed health care.Egan also hears voices and sees visions constantly. Diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in his late teens, he has learnt to manage his own health and wellbeing through the context of Māori culture rather than by using medication.
Helena Keyes
Helena Keyes is a mental health nurse and clinical coordinator for community mental health teams and acute inpatient units. She is also married to Egan Bidois.  Helena brings a clinical and personal perspective to a discussion of how their lived experiences can help others to work towards wellness.

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Breaking the Rules

Saturday September 30 - 12.30pm
HN Function Centre, Magdalinos Room
Adult $18.00

Kate De Goldi

Kate De Goldi writes fiction for all ages. She has been recipient of The Michael King Fellowship and twice winner of New Zealand Post Children’s Book of the Year. Her most recent novel, From the Cutting Room of Barney Kettle, won the Esther Glen Medal at the 2016 NZ Children’s Book Awards.
Kate reviews books in print and broadcast media and teaches creative writing at schools throughout New Zealand. She is co-editor, with Susan Paris, of ANNUAL, a miscellany for 9-13 year olds. ANNUAL 2 is due in September 2017.
Susan Paris
Susan has worked in educational publishing for eighteen years. She has been the editor of the School Journal for the last eleven years, producing over fifty journals. She has a long-term interest in children’s literature, which began by reviewing books for the New Zealand Book Council. She also writes chapter books for the overseas school market.




Family Fiction


Saturday September 30  -  5.30pm

Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent

Adult   $18.00


Jenny Pattrick


Jenny Pattrick is a writer and former jeweller whose nine published novels, including The Denniston Rose, its sequel Heart of Coal, the Whanganui novel, Landings, and Inheritance, set in Samoa, have all been NZ Number One Best Sellers.

She has chaired the Boards of many arts organisations including the Arts Council of New Zealand. In 2009 she received the NZ Post Mansfield Fellowship. In 2011 she and husband, musician Laughton Pattrick, published the children’s book and CD of songs, The Very Important Godwit. Her latest novel, Leap of Faith was released in 2017.





Mary-Anne Scott
Mary-anne Scott’s second novel, Coming Home to Roost, was shortlisted for this year’s New Zealand Children’s Book Award and won a Storylines Notable Book Award. Her first novel, Snakes and Ladders, won the Teenage Choice category in the 2013 Book Awards.

Mary-anne is no stranger to gritty teen issues, her four adult sons have made sure of that. And challenging family dynamics — influenced by growing up with eight siblings — have also influenced her writing. Mary-anne comes from Hawke’s Bay where she has a ‘second’ life as a singer, cellist and guitar teacher.



Beauty Matters


Saturday September 30  -  8.30pm

MTG Century Theatre, Napier

Adult   $18.00



David Trubridge


David Trubridge graduated from Newcastle University in England in 1972 with a degree in Naval Architecture (Boat Design). Working as a forester part-time in rural Northumberland for a short period, he taught himself to make furniture. His carefully crafted designs were shown all over the UK.

In 1981, Trubridge and his wife Linda set off to sail around the world with their two small sons. They sold all they had and bought ‘Hornpipe’, the yacht that was their home for the next ten years as they navigated their way throughout the Caribbean and the Pacific.
The family arrived in New Zealand in 1985. Deeply inspired by his impressions of the Pacific, Trubridge began to develop furniture which held close connotations with the sea.
Fortunes changed dramatically for Trubridge with his re-launch of Body Raft which was taken to the Milan Furniture Fair in 2001 and brought into production by Cappellini. This signaled the transformation of the business from a small-scale model to one that has a considerable presence on the international lighting and furniture market.




Keeping the Faith


Sunday October 1  -  11.00am

MTG Century Theatre, Napier

Adult   $18.00



Jenny Pattrick

Jenny Pattrick is a writer and former jeweller whose nine published novels, including The Denniston Rose, its sequel Heart of Coal, the Whanganui novel, Landings, and Inheritance, set in Samoa, have all been NZ Number One Best Sellers.

She has chaired the Boards of many arts organisations including the Arts Council of New Zealand. In 2009 she received the NZ Post Mansfield Fellowship. In 2011 she and husband, musician Laughton Pattrick, published the children’s book and CD of songs, The Very Important Godwit. Her latest novel, Leap of Faith was released in 2017.








Writing Historical Fiction

Sunday October 1 -  2.00pm
Hastings City Art Gallery
Adult  $40.00


Jenny Pattrick



Jenny Pattrick is a writer and former jeweller whose nine published novels, including The Denniston Rose, its sequel Heart of Coal, the Whanganui novel, Landings, and Inheritance, set in Samoa, have all been NZ Number One Best Sellers.

She has chaired the Boards of many arts organisations including the Arts Council of New Zealand. In 2009 she received the NZ Post Mansfield Fellowship. In 2011 she and husband, musician Laughton Pattrick, published the children’s book and CD of songs, The Very Important Godwit.

Her latest novel, Leap of Faith was released in 2017. Participants will be set a simple 100 work exercise (it will be fun) to complete and send back to Jenny a week before
the workshop.












It's a Kind of Magic

Sunday October 1 - 2.30pm
Spiegeltent, Havelock North
Adult $18


Kate De Goldi

Kate De Goldi writes fiction for all ages. She has been recipient of The Michael King Fellowship and twice winner of New Zealand Post Children’s Book of the Year. Her most recent novel, From the Cutting Room of Barney Kettle, won the Esther Glen Medal at the 2016 NZ Children’s Book Awards.

Kate reviews books in print and broadcast media and teaches creative writing at schools throughout New Zealand. She is co-editor, with Susan Paris, of ANNUAL, a miscellany for 9-13 year olds. ANNUAL 2 is due in September 2017.



Gareth Ward

Gareth Ward, a.k.a. The Great Wardini is a magician, hypnotist, storyteller, bookseller and author. He has worked as a Royal Marine Commando, Police Officer, Evil Magician and Zombie. He basically likes jobs where you get to wear really cool hats.

Born in the town of Banbury in the UK, he attended the University of York where he gained a joint honours degree in Biology and Computer Science. If you want your cat reprogrammed, he’s your man.

He currently resides in Hawke’s Bay, where he runs two independent bookshops, Wardini Books Havelock North and Wardini Books Napier with his wife Louise and son Max. He has a goldfish called Luna, a dog called Tonks and is certain his letter from Hogwarts has been lost in the post.

His first novel, The Traitor and the Thief, a rip-roaring young adult Steampunk adventure, won the 2016 Storylines Tessa Duder Award.



We Need to Talk About P

Monday October 2 -  5.30pm
Spiegeltent, Havelock North
Adult  $18


Dr Joseph Stone

Joseph B. Stone, Ph.D., is a member of the Anmsakipikuni and Lakota tribes and was raised on Montana Indian Reservation cattle ranch. He is a graduate of Utah State University Combined Professional-Scientific Psychology Training Program American Indian Support Project. He has 22 years of professional experience as a director and program manager for various tribes and recently retired after six years as Chief of Department for Gallup Indian Medical Center Behavioral Health Services.

Currently, Dr. Stone works as a clinical provider at Central Health Te Poutama Taukoko in Hastings, Central Health Package of Care Counseling at Hawkes Bay Regional Prison and Accord Psychological Services and Counseling at the Napier Family Centre. Dr. Stone has lectured internationally and published widely on indigenous behavioral health, addiction issues, and on methamphetamine assessment and treatment in tribal communities. He has also served as a behavioral health consultant to the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

Amber Logan

Amber Logan is a registered Psychologist (Health specialty), graduate of the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical & Health Science, a McLeod Scholar and mother of five. As a psychologist with a special interest in the relationship between mental and physical health, she has over 15 years of experience working in the individual and public health, and research.

She is currently a PhD candidate, Professional Practice Fellow with the University of Otago School of Medicine, and leader of an international working group for the development of Health Psychologists working with indigenous peoples. Amber’s work in methamphetamine use and addiction stems from her professional training, research work, and personal observation of the drug's effects in local communities.

Amber grew up at Waipatu in Hawke’s Bay and has lectured at a number of overseas Government agencies and institutions including the University of Washington and Harvard University.

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Diversity


Tuesday October 3 -  5.30pm

Parlour Projects, Hastings

Adults  $18


William Yang

Photographer, film-maker and performance artist William Yang is a major figure in Australian art and celebrity society. He is the subject of William Yang: Stories of Love and Death, which looks at Yang’s documentation of the impact of the AIDS virus on the Sydney arts scene, and the joyful celebration of the LGBT scene as he records not just the glitterati, but also the forlorn and forgotten.






The Magic Pen

Wednesday October 4 -  2pm
Hastings City Art Gallery
Adults  $40


Dylan Horrocks

Dylan Horrocks is the author of the graphic novels Hicksville, Sam Zabel & the Magic Pen and Incomplete Works and the comic book series Pickle and Atlas. He has written Hunter: the Age of Magic for Vertigo and Batgirl for DC Comics, and his stories and cartoons have appeared in magazines and books around the world. He's won a Will Eisner Comics Industry Award, a Sir Julius Vogel Award and a New Zealand Arts Foundation Laureate. Dylan currently lives in Wellington, where he's working on a new graphic novel about fantasy role-playing games.




Sorry, sold out!





Beside Herself


Friday October 6 -  5.30pm

Arts Inc Heretaunga

Adult  $18



Chris Price

Chris Price is a poet, essayist and occasional musician. Of her latest book, Beside Herself, Paula Green writes that ‘As poet, Price exhibits an infectious curiosity, prodigious reading and an ability to make words sing.’ An earlier collection, The Blind Singer, explores musical themes, and an essay on music and poetry appears in The Fuse Box (VUP, 2017). Chris’s first collection, Husk, won the NZ Post Book Award for Best First Book of Poetry, and the genre-bending ‘biographical dictionary’ Brief Lives was shortlisted for the NZ Book Awards.

Chris managed the NZ Festival’s Writer’s Week for 12 years, edited Landfall in the 90s, and was awarded the 2011 Katherine Mansfield Fellowship. She has contributed to two science/art collaborations: the physics-related anthology Are Angels OK?, and the German-NZ Transit of Venus Poetry Exchange, published as Transit of Venus/Venus Transit. She convenes the poetry and creative non-fiction MA workshop at Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, and is published by Auckland University Press.






Robbie Duncan


Robbie Duncan is a musician who has previously performed with his partner Chris at the Poets Night out event.









From Ahuriri to China


Saturday October 7 - 1.00pm
HN Function Centre, Magdalinos Room
Adult $18



Deborah Challinor


Deborah Challinor is the author of fifteen bestselling historical fiction novels, two works of non-fiction about the Vietnam War, and a young adult novel. In 2010 she moved from New Zealand to Newcastle, Australia, to write a series of novels set in 1830s Sydney about four convict girls inspired by her own family history, but returned to New Zealand at the end of 2014. She is currently working on a trilogy set in New Zealand, Sydney and Vietnam in the 1950s and 1960s.

For the last two years she has been the number one bestselling author of fiction in New Zealand, and recently received an outstanding alumni award from Waikato University.

Deborah was born and raised in Huntly, New Zealand, and attended Huntly College. She has a Ph.D in history from Waikato University, wrote an opinion column and feature articles for newspapers, has edited special publications and books, and taught researching and writing historical fiction, and general New Zealand history, at university level for several years. She writes fiction full time, and her books are sold in New Zealand, Australia, the UK, Germany, Russia and Czechoslovakia, and in eBook, audio and large print formats
.






Lies, Fake Lies, and Alternative Facts

Saturday October 7 -  3.30

HN Function Centre, Magdalinos Room

Adult $18

Nicky Hager

Nicky Hager is an author and investigative journalist based in Wellington, New Zealand. He has written six best-selling books.
He specialises in investigating hard-to-document subjects, such as


- the military
- intelligence agencies
- public relations activities and
- the unseen sides of politics.




Big Fiction



Saturday October 7 - 5.30pm
HN Fucnction Centre, Magdalinos Room
Adult $18

Stephen Daisley

At the age of 53, Stephen Daisley sold his first novel Traitor to Text Publishing. He subsequently won the 2011 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction and UTS Glenda Adams Award. This same novel was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers for Best First Book, the Western Australia Premieres Literary Awards and NSW Christina Stead Prize for Fiction. Stephen’s second novel, Coming Rain, won the 2016 Ockham Award and was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award. Reviewer James Bradley (The Australian) wrote that ‘Daisley’s prose possesses a shimmering, allusive beauty reminiscent of John McGahern.’

Born in 1955 in Hastings, New Zealand, Stephen spent five years in the army before living in Bangkok, then worked in Australia and New Zealand as a sheep herder, bush cutter, truck driver, construction worker and bartender. After beginning his marriage and family life in New Zealand he eventually moved to Australia, attending Murdoch University and then the University of Western Australia for Post Graduate studies, supervised by Australian writer Gail Jones. During this time, Stephen underwent what he describes as his ’30 year literary apprenticeship’.

Stephen lives in Western Australia with his wife and five children.

Catherine Chidgey

Catherine Chidgey’s honours include Best First Book at the New Zealand Book Awards and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for her region; the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Short Story Award; the Katherine Mansfield Fellowship to Menton, France; the inaugural Prize in Modern Letters; a Betty Trask Award (UK); and a longlisting for the Orange Prize. Her novel Golden Deeds was chosen as a book of the year by Time Out magazine (London), as well as by the New York Times Book Review and the LA Times Book Review.

She has been Writer in Residence at the Universities of Canterbury, Otago and Waikato. She teaches creative writing at the University of Waikato and Manukau Institute of Technology. Her most recent novel, The Wish Child, won the $50,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize for 2017, and her new book, The Beat of the Pendulum, is published in November.



A Sense of Place

Sunday October 8 -  10.30

Hastings City Art Gallery
Adult  $40




Catherine Chidgey

Catherine Chidgey’s honours include Best First Book at the New Zealand Book Awards and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for her region; the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Short Story Award; the Katherine Mansfield Fellowship to Menton, France; the inaugural Prize in Modern Letters; a Betty Trask Award (UK); and a longlisting for the Orange Prize. Her novel Golden Deeds was chosen as a book of the year by Time Out magazine (London), as well as by the New York Times Book Review and the LA Times Book Review. 


She has been Writer in Residence at the Universities of Canterbury, Otago and Waikato. She teaches creative writing at the University of Waikato and Manukau Institute of Technology. Her most recent novel, The Wish Child, won the $50,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize for 2017, and her new book, The Beat of the Pendulum, is published in November.



Other People's Stories



Sunday October 8 - 11.00am
Adult $18


Deborah Challinor

Deborah Challinor is the author of fifteen bestselling historical fiction novels, two works of non-fiction about the Vietnam War, and a young adult novel. In 2010 she moved from New Zealand to Newcastle, Australia, to write a series of novels set in 1830s Sydney about four convict girls inspired by her own family history, but returned to New Zealand at the end of 2014. She is currently working on a trilogy set in New Zealand, Sydney and Vietnam in the 1950s and 1960s.

For the last two years she has been the number one bestselling author of fiction in New Zealand, and recently received an outstanding alumni award from Waikato University.

Deborah was born and raised in Huntly, New Zealand, and attended Huntly College. She has a Ph.D in history from Waikato University, wrote an opinion column and feature articles for newspapers, has edited special publications and books, and taught researching and writing historical fiction, and general New Zealand history, at university level for several years. She writes fiction full time, and her books are sold in New Zealand, Australia, the UK, Germany, Russia and Czechoslovakia, and in eBook, audio and large print formats.



Stephen Daisley

At the age of 53, Stephen Daisley sold his first novel Traitor to Text Publishing. He subsequently won the 2011 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction and UTS Glenda Adams Award. This same novel was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers for Best First Book, the Western Australia Premieres Literary Awards and NSW Christina Stead Prize for Fiction. Stephen’s second novel, Coming Rain, won the 2016 Ockham Award and was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award. Reviewer James Bradley (The Australian) wrote that ‘Daisley’s prose possesses a shimmering, allusive beauty reminiscent of John McGahern.’

Born in 1955 in Hastings, New Zealand, Stephen spent five years in the army before living in Bangkok, then worked in Australia and New Zealand as a sheep herder, bush cutter, truck driver, construction worker and bartender. After beginning his marriage and family life in New Zealand he eventually moved to Australia, attending Murdoch University and then the University of Western Australia for Post Graduate studies, supervised by Australian writer Gail Jones. During this time, Stephen underwent what he describes as his ’30 year literary apprenticeship’.




Stephen lives in Western Australia with his wife and five children.
Click here to buy tickets
The Wish Child



Catherine Chidgey

Catherine Chidgey’s honours include Best First Book at the New Zealand Book Awards and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for her region; the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Short Story Award; the Katherine Mansfield Fellowship to Menton, France; the inaugural Prize in Modern Letters; a Betty Trask Award (UK); and a longlisting for the Orange Prize. Her novel Golden Deeds was chosen as a book of the year by Time Out magazine (London), as well as by the New York Times Book Review and the LA Times Book Review. 


She has been Writer in Residence at the Universities of Canterbury, Otago and Waikato. She teaches creative writing at the University of Waikato and Manukau Institute of Technology. Her most recent novel, The Wish Child, won the $50,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize for 2017, and her new book, The Beat of the Pendulum, is published in November.

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Poet Laureate 2016

CK Stead

C.K. Stead was born in Auckland in 1932. He began writing poetry while still at school, and publishing as a student.  His awards for poetry have included the Jessie Mackay Award, the New Zealand Book Award for poetry, the King’s Lynn Poetry prize, the Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, and the Sarah Broom prize.  His Collected Poems 1951-2006 received a Montana Prize in 2009.

Other literary awards and prizes include the Katherine Mansfield Short Story award, the New Zealand Book Award for fiction (twice), and the Sunday Times/EFG Private Bank Short Story Prize.  In 2011 he received the Prime Minister’s Award for Fiction.  He has had novels translated into 11 European languages.

His most recent publications are a novel, Risk (MacLehose, 2012) and a collection of poems, The Yellow Buoy (AUP, 2013). A new collection of critical essays, Shelf Life, will appear later this year. 
He was made a member of the Order of New Zealand in 2007.

Guest readers

Greg O'Brien



Born in Matamata in 1961, Gregory O'Brien is a Wellington-based poet, essayist, painter and art writer, whose recent books include the poetry collection Whale Years (2015) and See What I Can See--New Zealand photography for the young and curious (2015). More recently, he has co-edited, with Nick Bevin, a book about John Scott's Futuna Chapel (forthcoming in June), and, as Stout Memorial Fellow at Victoria University 2015-16, he is currently writing a book about the imagination and the environment. In 2006 fashion designer Doris de Pont based her summer collection around O'Brien's poems from Afternoon of an evening train (2005).

Paula Green


Paula Green has published eight poetry collections including several for children. Co-written with Harry Ricketts, her book 99 Ways into New Zealand Poetry was short-listed for the 2010 NZ Post Book Awards. 

In 2012, she edited Dear Heart: 150 New Zealand Love Poems. She runs two blogs: NZ Poetry Box and NZ Poetry Shelf. A new poetry collection, New York Pocket Book, is due at the end of April.

Her most recent children’s books include The Letter Box Cat and other poems and A Treasury of New Zealand Poetry for Children. The former won Children’s Choice at the 2015 NZ Book Awards.
She lives near Auckland’s West Coast.

Chris Price

Chris Price teaches the poetry and creative non-fiction MA at the International Institute of Modern Letters, Victoria University. She managed the New Zealand Festival’s Writer’s Week for 12 years, and for much of the 90s she edited the literary journal Landfall. Price’s first collection of poems, Husk, won the 2002 NZSA Jessie Mackay Award for Best First Book of Poetry. Her next book, the genre-busting Brief Lives, was shortlisted for the 2007 Montana New Zealand Book Awards. AUP published Price’s third book, The Blind Singer, in 2009. Price was awarded the 2011 Katherine Mansfield Fellowship. She has also contributed to two science/art collaborations, Are Angels OK? (2006), and the Transit of Venus Poetry Exchange, which paired German and New Zealand poets and culminated in performances at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair.




2014 

Vincent O'Sullivan


Vincent has long been recognized as one of New Zealand’s significant literary figures, through his extensive publications as a short story writer, novelist, biographer, playwright, and editor, as well as for his many volumes of poetry. Vincent lives in Dunedin.

He has received Montana Awards for poetry as well as for fiction, the Prime Minister’s Award in 2005, and in 2000 was made a Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.
Vincent is also the pre-eminent Katherine Mansfield scholar, being co-editor of the five volume edition of her Collected Letters, and the two volumes of her Complete Fiction, published last year by Edinburgh University Press.

His most recent collection of poetry, Us, Then, was published in 2013 by Victoria University Press, which this year will bring out both his Selected Poems, and The Families, a new book of short stories.
As the British critic Chris Millar wrote of O’Sullivan’s work, ‘You can’t ask much more of a poet than wit, profundity and elegance, and they’re all here in spades.’

Greg O'Brien

Born in Matamata in 1961, Gregory O'Brien has written numerous collections of poetry, most recently Citizen of Santiago with photographer Bruce Foster, (2013) and Beauties of the Octogonal Pool (2012). He also paints, makes prints and has worked with his handpress printer brother Brendan on many small books and miscellaneous productions.


Jenny Bornholdt

Jenny Bornholdt was born in Wellington in 1960. She has published nine books of poems, including: This Big Face (1988), Miss New Zealand: Selected Poems (1997), These Days (2000), Summer (2005), Mrs Winter's Jump (2007) and The Rocky Shore (2008).

Jenny is married to fellow poet Gregory O'Brien. With Greg, she co-edited My Heart Goes Swimming: New Zealand Love Poems (1996), and with Greg and Mark Williams, she edited An Anthology of New Zealand Poetry in English (1997), which won the 1997 Montana Book Award for Poetry.

In 2002 Jenny was awarded the Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Fellowship. The poems in her collection, Summer, record the experiences of the poet and her family through the Mediterranean summer of that year.

Jenny was made an Arts Foundation Laureate in 2003.

In 2005 she became the fifth Te Mata Estate Poet Laureate, during which time she wrote Mrs Winter's Jump, a Godwit book for Random House which was launched in June 2007. The Rocky Shore (2008), published by Victoria University Press, is described as a book of "talky poems...ranging over a wide variety of territory - love, death, children, illness, breadmaking and the garden". The Rocky Shore won the 2009 Montana New Zealand Book Award for Poetry.

In 2010, Jenny was the Creative New Zealand Victoria University Writer in Residence. During that year she completed a book of poems, The Hill of Wool, which was published in 2011 by Victoria University Press.

At the end of 2013 Jenny was acknowledged in the New Year's Honour's list as a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Brian Turner

Photo by Gilbert van Reenen
Brian is a well-known New Zealand writer and a member of one of his country's most famous sporting families – his brothers, Glenn (cricket) and Greg (golf), were distinguished sports internationals.

Turner is a former New Zealand hockey player (also captain of Otago and Wellington) and has published best-selling sports biographies (with Colin Meads, Josh Kronfeld, Anton Oliver and Glenn Turner). His many other books include the autobiographical Somebodies and Nobodies: Growing up in an extraordinary sporting Family; Timeless Land (with Grahame Sydney and Owen Marshall); and numerous collections of poetry, including Ladders of Rain (joint winner Commonwealth Poetry prize 1978), Beyond (winner NZ Book Awards for Poetry 1993), and Just This (winner NZ Post Book Award for Poetry 2010). He was the Te Mata Estate NZ Poet Laureate 2003-05.

In 1994-5 he held an Arts Council Scholarship in Letters. He was Robert Burns Fellow at the University of Otago in 1984 and Writer in Residence at the University of Canterbury in 1997.

He was awarded the Lauris Edmond Memorial Award for Poetry in 2009 and ‘The New Zealand Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in Poetry 2009’. He received an Hon D Litt from the University of Otago in 2011.

His most recent books are the best-selling Into the Wider World (shortlisted for the 2009 Montana Book Awards) which focuses on his love of and concerns for the future of this country's natural environment, Just This, winner of the NZ Post Book Award for Poetry in 2010, and a further collection of poems, Inside Outside (2011). A major collection of new and previously published work, Elemental – Central Otago Poems (with photographs by Gilbert van Reenen) was published in August 2012.

The entry on Turner and his work in The Oxford Anthology to New Zealand Literature states that, ‘Beneath the wit, the no-nonsense honesty, the rigorous clarity of sense and the sinewy rhythmic energy of the poems' surfaces runs the craft of a sophisticated, confident and well-read poet [with] echoes of Berryman, Merwin, Durcan, Baxter. [His poems impress with their] complex sound structures and a fine vibrant lyricism, the more singing because anchored so naturally in observed reality…’

Brian Turner has been publishing poems since the 1960s. Up until 1986 his writing was fitted around work as a customs officer, publisher’s rep and editor (1968-74) for Oxford University Press in Wellington, NZ, journalist, managing editor of the Otago publishing firm John McIndoe Limited, work in sawmills, construction sites and as a rabbiter in Central Otago. In the 1970s he spent a year working in radio as a journalist and news reader. Since the mid-1980s he has worked full-time as a writer and journalist, occasionally a broadcaster, and also as a golf caddy on the European, Australian and New Zealand professional golf tours.

He sees himself as a southern New Zealander who, while having grown up in Dunedin, and lived in Christchurch and Wellington at various times, has spent a great deal of his time in the outdoors – tramping, cycling, climbing, and sailing.

Brian Turner was born in Dunedin in 1944 and attended Otago Boys’ High School (1957-61) where he captained the school’s first cricket and hockey XIs. He lives in Oturehua, a small town in the Ida Valley, Central Otago.


Dame Anne Salmond

Dame Anne Salmond is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Auckland and is one of New Zealand’s most prominent anthropologists and historians. Salmond is the author of several culturally significant books, including Two Worlds: First Meetings between Maori and Europeans, 1642–1772, Between Worlds: Early Exchanges between Maori and Europeans, 1773–1815, The Trial of the Cannibal Dog: Captain Cook in the South Seas, Aphrodite’s Island: The European Discovery of Tahiti, and her most recent 2011 publication, Bligh: William Bligh in the South Seas.

Salmond is also a committed environmentalist and has been involved in establishing the Longbush Ecological Trust, for the restoration of The Waikereru Ecosanctuary in Gisborne. The royalties for the New Zealand printing of Bligh: William Bligh in the South Seas have been donated to this charity.

She received the CBE for services to literature and the Maori people in 1988 and was made Dame Commander of the British Empire for services to New Zealand history in 1995. In 2009, she was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) for her excellence in scientific research. Salmond was recently honoured as the 2013 Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year.

Tusiata Avia

Tusiata Avia is a poet, performer and writer. She has published two books of poetry: Wild Dogs Under My Skirt and Bloodclot, and two children’s books and is regularly published in international literary journals.

She wrote and performed a one-woman theatre show (also called Wild Dogs Under My Skirt) that toured internationally for a number of years.

Tusiata has held a number of writer’s residencies including the Fulbright Pacific Writer’s Fellowhip at University of Hawai’i and the Ursula Bethel Writer in Residence at University of Canterbury. Tusiata travels widely and has performed at poetry festivals from Morocco to Jerusalem and most recently at Poetry Parnassus, where she represented Samoa at the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.

Alexa Johnston

Alexa Johnston grew up in Auckland, the middle daughter of Malcolm Johnston, a Presbyterian minister and Paula Johnston, a primary school teacher, both of whom gave cheerful encouragement to her early interest in baking and cooking.

After completing an M.A. in Art History in 1978 Alexa spent 19 years as a curator at Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki. She is now an independent writer and curator and in 2002 was curator of the exhibition Sir Edmund Hillary: Everest and Beyond for Auckland War Memorial Museum.

Her authorised, illustrated biography Sir Edmund Hillary: An Extraordinary Life was published by Penguin in 2005.

Alexa has written three books paying tribute to the skills of earlier generations of home cooks: Ladies, a Plate, A Second Helping and What’s for Pudding? A fourth book in the series, Ladies, a Plate: Jams and Preserves will be published this year. Alexa makes and tests all the recipes for her cook books – and takes all the photographs – in her home kitchen in Auckland.

Photo by Sharon Blance

Rachael King 

The author of two adult novels: The Sound of Butterflies, which won Best First Book (Fiction) at the 2007 Montana New Zealand Book Awards, and Magpie Hall (2009).

Her latest book is Red Rocks, a novel for children, set on Wellington’s wild south coast, a retelling of the selkie myth. It has been selected as a finalist in the Junior Fiction section in the New Zealand Post Children's Book Awards 2013.

Rachael’s work has been translated into nine languages.  

Rachel spent a formative year in 1983 in Hastings, attending the Rudolph Steiner school, before moving back to Auckland, where she grew up and spent early adulthood playing in rock bands and working for alternative radio and magazines. She currently lives in Christchurch and is working on new novels for both kids and adults.

   

Photo by John Goodhind

Marty Smith

Marty Smith grew up on a steep hill country farm in North Wairarapa, with weather terrible enough to make tough going for one man and his kids. One of the narrative strands of her poems is her father’s war with almost everything; the other is the world of horse racing and the strangeness of creatures that ride on top of each other.

Her poems have been published in Best New Zealand Poems 2009 and 2011, and in the anthology Best of Best New Zealand Poems. The manuscript for her debut collection Horse with hat was short-listed for the 2011 Kathleen Grattan Award. Horse with hat will be published by VUP in 2014.


Photo by Liz Marsh

Peter Wells

Peter Well's most recent book was The Hungry heart - Journeys with William Colenso which looked at the highly colourful life of the talented Hawke's Bay polymath and refusnik.

Peter's background is history which he studied at Auckland University and the University of Warwick, England. He became an author in 1991 with his first book of short stories,Dangerous Desires, which won the 1992 NZ Book Award for Fiction. Since then he has written award-winning fiction and a memoir, Long Loop Home which won the 2002 Montana NZ Book Award for Biography. He has also been a film-maker, notably of documentaries like The Newest City on the Globe! which helped established Napier's Art Deco as an international destination.

In 2012 he was awarded the Michael King Fellowship, the top nonfiction prize in New Zealand in order to research and write a book on Volkner and Kereopa Te Rau. The book is called Comet through a Night Sky and is due out in 2014.


Photo by Douglas Higginbotham

Tim Wilson

Tim Wilson currently works for TVNZ. He has written for the Guardian, Newsweek.com, the New York Times, Women’s Weekly, and New Idea.

His novel about the rapture, Their Faces Were Shining, was published in 2010. A collection of short stories, The Desolation Angel, appeared the following year. He is currently working on a novel The Spanish Harlem Bureau. 

 

 

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Adele Broadbent

Adele Broadbent is the author of three novels for children and has had several educational titles with Wendy Pye Publishers and Learning Media.

Her novel Just Jack was a finalist in the 2012 New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards and is also a Storylines Notable Book. Too Many Secrets, the first book in the ‘Herrick’ series, was nominated in the 2011 New Zealand  Post Children’s Book Awards and its sequel The Last Herrick Secret was launched November 2012.

Adele loves being a children’s bookseller/reviewer with Beattie & Forbes Booksellers in Napier and also enjoys being in her garden, spending time with family and her many pets. She is currently working on a novel for young teens.


Photo by George Brummer

Mary-anne Scott

Mary-anne Scott was born into a family of nine children where there was a culture of books, music and writing. Her mother, Joy Watson, authored the popular Grandpa Slippers series.

Music and books are still a big part of Mary-anne’s life today. She is an avid reader of fiction and has a particular interest in books and short stories for young adults. She is also a singer, guitarist and cellist and regularly plays at venues.

Mary-anne is married to Paul and they have four sons, ranging in age from 28 to 20. The experiences, both good and bad, of her sons and their friends have been great fodder for her writing.

Her first teenage novel Snakes and Ladders was published May 2012 and has been selected as a finalist Young Adult Fiction section in the New Zealand Post Children's Book Awards 2013.


Aaron Topp

Aaron Topp writes young adult fiction, and won an Honour Award at the 2007 NZ Post Children's Book Awards' Best First Young Adult Fiction Book for Single Fin, a page-turning novel set in the surfing world. It was also a 2007 Storylines Notable Young Adult Fiction Book, and is based on a true story. A former teacher, he now works in the rural family business in Hawke's Bay. An avid surfer since he was 14, Topp also compiled Creating Waves: How Surfing Inspires Our Most Creative New Zealanders, a collection which explores the role of surfing and sea in the lives of leading musicians, painters, sculptors, poets and writers.

On Lowly's Book Blog, Single Fin is commended: 'Just like Wendy Orr's Peeling the Onion written as she recovered from an injury was powerful, this book has the same powerful heartfelt resonance of truth. There is enough surfing lingo and information to please any young male reader. . . . . The situations ring true.'

Reviewing Creating Waves in Boat Books, the book is described as 'full of fascinating insights into New Zealand's surfing world' and makes you 'want to pick up the surfboard and head for the beach'.