The Readers and Writers Programme in the 2016 Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival


Here is the Readers and Writers Line-up for the 2016 Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival!

Scroll down to see the amazing guests we have in store for you.

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I do as the tune tells me

Wednesday October 5  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Innovator and inventionist Bill Manhire’s writing has never behaved; playful on the surface, his stories and poems are often finely phrased acts of rebellion.

The Godfather of inventive writing, Bill is famous for founding the International Institute of Modern Letters (IIML). Famous for winning the IIML’s Adam Prize, wildly creative poet Hera Lindsay Bird will lead Bill in a discussion of his short stories, poetry, life, the universe and everything.

BILL MANHIRE

Bill Manhire was the inaugural Te Mata New Zealand Poet Laureate. He grew up in small country pubs in Otago and Southland, and was educated at the University of Otago and at University College London, where he tried – and failed – to become an Old Norse scholar. He founded the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University, home to New Zealand’s leading creative writing program. Last year he was the UNESCO Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.

Bill’s most recent book is a collection of short fiction, The Stories of Bill Manhire (VUP, 2015). Recent poetry collections include Lifted, The Victims of Lightning, and a Selected Poems. Bill has also been writing lyrics for the composer Norman Meehan, some of which are collected on the albums Buddhist Rain and Making Baby Float.

HERA LINDSAY BIRD

Hera Lindsay Bird is a Wellington based writer. She has an MA in poetry from the International Institute of Modern Letters where she won the 2011 Adam Prize for best folio. Her debut, self-titled book was published by Victoria University Press this year.
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On the Wild Side

Thursday October 6  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00
MAY CONTAIN COARSE LANGUAGE

The most famous poet in New Zealand shares the stage with three debut poets. Bill Manhire is internationally acclaimed as an experimental, innovative and playful poet; Hera Lindsay Bird is one of the most startling and exciting new talents on the block; Gregory Kan uses the poetry app he invented to experiment with language, and Marty Smith uses natural speech patterns to examine smokers, swearers and fighters.

All four sail close to the wind at times. They choose some wild things to read from their work.

BILL MANHIRE

Bill Manhire was the inaugural Te Mata New Zealand Poet Laureate. He grew up in small country pubs in Otago and Southland, and was educated at the University of Otago and at University College London, where he tried – and failed – to become an Old Norse scholar. He founded the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University, home to New Zealand’s leading creative writing program. Last year he was the UNESCO Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.

Bill’s most recent book is a collection of short fiction, The Stories of Bill Manhire (VUP, 2015). Recent poetry collections include Lifted, The Victims of Lightning, and a Selected Poems. Bill has also been writing lyrics for the composer Norman Meehan, some of which are collected on the albums Buddhist Rain and Making Baby Float.

HERA LINDSAY BIRD

Hera Lindsay Bird is a Wellington based writer. She has an MA in poetry from the International Institute of Modern Letters where she won the 2011 Adam Prize for best folio. Her debut, self-titled book was published by Victoria University Press this year.

GREGORY KAN

Gregory Kan is a writer based in Auckland. His work has been featured in literary journals and magazines such as brief, Hue & Cry, Listener, Minarets, otoliths, Percutio, SPORT and Turbine. His writing has also featured in various contemporary art exhibitions, journals and catalogues, for institutions such as the Adam Art Gallery, Artspace, RM, Te Tuhi and The Physics Room. His first book, This Paper Boat, was published by Auckland University Press in 2016. An earlier incarnation of This Paper Boat was shortlisted for the Kathleen Grattan Poetry Prize in 2013.

MARTY SMITH

Marty Smith grew up in remote hill country in North Wairarapa between Pahiatua and the sea, and she likes to look at the lives of people who do tough work. Her debut poetry collection Horse with Hat looks at the fallout from the work soldiers had to do in war, often expressed through tense family relationships; it also talks to the long relationship between horses and men.

She is carrying out research for her next book at the Hawke's Bay racecourse, while teaching part-time at Taradale High School. Horse with Hat won the Jesse Mackay Award for Best First Book of Poetry in the New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014 and made history for also being a finalist in the poetry category of the same awards.





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WWI Voices
Saturday October 8  -  11.00am - 12.00pm
Napier Century Theatre (MTG)
Adult   $15.00

Inspired by a folder of letters, a notebook and a set of handmade postcards, Anna Mackenzie followed a family story into the trenches and archives of the Great War. She shares her journey into and beyond the war, focussing particularly on the war stories often ignored: the role of the medical services, of women, of those tasked with ‘mopping up’.

ANNA MACKENZIE

Mackenzie’s critically acclaimed novel Evie’s War explores WWI through the eyes of a naïve young New Zealander. Her next novel follows the story of three damaged men whose work lies in bringing in the dead.

Anna Mackenzie writes historic, contemporary and speculative fiction, edits magazines and teaches creative writing. She wrote her first book when she was six – and is very glad her mother kept it! Her nine titles have netted her seven Notable Book Awards, an NZ Post Honour Award and Sir Julius Vogel Award. She lives on a farm in Hawke’s Bay, and is Vice-President of the NZ Society of Authors.




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Using graphic novel-like animation, 25 April brings First World War experiences out of the usual black-and-white archive pictures and into vibrant, dynamic colour.

25 April tells the story of New Zealand’s involvement in this flawed and brutal campaign, which led to the deaths of thousands of young men and women.

Free screening.

Saturday October 8th Napier RSA - 1.30pm - 2.55pm
Sunday October 9th Club hastings (RSA) - 1.30pm - 2.55pm
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You've Never Had It So Good

Saturday October 8  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Theatre has never been so strong, varied, and exciting as it is right now. There are new shows being presented in New Zealand almost every day, from the mighty Civic in Auckland and the Pop-Up Globe, to a thirty-seat theatre in a suburban café. In October, Auckland Theatre Company will be opening its brand-new theatre on the waterfront, and this energy and diversity is reflected throughout the country.

Roger Hall and fellow playwright Lynda Chanwai-Earle discuss this topic, their own work, and the impact New Zealand plays are making overseas.

ROGER HALL

70 Years a Theatregoer; 50 years a writer; 40 years a playwright.

Roger Hall’s first stage play, Glide Time, was produced in 1976, and was a smash hit throughout the country. His next play, Middle Age Spread, was equally successful and also went to the West End where it ran for 15 months and won Comedy of the Year Award. He has been writing a stage play every year since then, plus musicals and pantomimes.

He has written more than seventy sitcom episodes for TV, from Gliding On to Spin Doctors, and Conjugal Rites made and screened in the UK. Recent plays have included Four Flat Whites in Italy; A Short Cut to Happiness; You Can Always Hand Them Back and Last Legs.

He has been awarded a QSO, a CNZM and an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from Victoria University, and last year received the Prime Minister’s Award for Achievement in Literature, the first playwright to get this recognition.

LYNDA CHANWAI-EARLE

Lynda Chanwai-Earle is a fourth-generation Chinese–New Zealander who was born in London. Having spent her early years in Papua New Guinea, Lynda completed her education in New Zealand, which earnt her a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Diploma in Drama (The University of Auckland), as well as a Masters in Creative Writing (Victoria University of Wellington).

As a playwright, poet, filmmaker and actor, Lynda has been breaking ground for over 20 years. Her acclaimed one-woman show Ka-Shue (Letters Home) (1996) was the first authentic Chinese–New Zealand play to hit stages both domestically and abroad. Man in a Suitcase premiered at the Court Theatre in Christchurch and toured to the Haidian Theatre in Beijing (2012) despite Chinese governmental censorship. Moreover, her acclaimed play Heat (STAB Festival, 2008) set in Antarctica was the first alternatively powered play to tour festivals around New Zealand in 2010–2011.

Lynda was the inaugural Writer in Residence at Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China in 2015. In the past, she has also been invited to be a guest writer at the Hong Kong Literary Festival (2001), Philippines Asia–Pacific Poetry Conference (2002), the Queensland Poetry Festival (2003), and the Shanghai Literary Festival (2005). Lynda has also been short-listed for the Bruce Mason Playwriting Award twice.

Lynda was formerly a journalist for the weekly programme Asia Down Under on Television New Zealand. She is now a full-time Producer at Radio New Zealand, National creating the weekly Voices programme and other documentaries. She currently lives in Wellington with her two young daughters.



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A Fair Go

Monday October 10  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

In the face of child poverty, homelessness and social inequality, what’s happened to giving everyone a fair go? We prided ourselves on being an egalitarian nation, on being world leaders in addressing welfare. How can we get back to being a dynamic and healthy society that works for everyone?

Economist of the moment, Shamubeel Eaqub discusses the preoccupations of our times, and what’s happening in Hawke's Bay, with James Rowe.

SHAMUBEEL EAQUB

Shamubeel Eaqub is an experienced economist who makes economics easy. He is also an author, media commentator and a thought leading public speaker. He has over a decade of experience as an economist in Wellington, Melbourne and Auckland in leading international banks and consultancy.

He is on various boards of charities and commercial firms. He writes books in his own time on issues that matter to New Zealand and gives voice to the unheard: Generation Rent (2015), co-authored with Selena Eaqub, Growing Apart: Regional Prosperity in NZ (2014), The NZ Economy: An Introduction (2011), co-authored with Dr Ralph Lattimore and Once In A Lifetime: City-Building After Disaster In Christchurch (2014), contributing chapter.

Shamubeel is currently on a career break to be a full time dad and lives in Auckland with his wife and son. He grew up in Canterbury and holds a BCOM with Honours in Economics from Lincoln University.

JAMES E. ROWE

James E. Rowe is the Economic Development Manager for the Napier City Council and has previously worked in Australia, Thailand, Kiribati and the USA. Dr. Rowe holds a Ph.D. in planning from the University of Auckland and master degrees from the University of Tennessee and the College of New Jersey.

He is the book and policy review editor for Regional Science Policy and Practice. His most recent book, Understanding the Practice of Local Economic Development: An Alternative Theoretical Framework was published November 2014. He has published three other books, a book chapter and over 40 articles plus numerous book reviews in leading professional journals such as Town Planning Review, Applied Geography, Regional Science Policy and Practice, The Australian Planner, Local Economy, Urban Policy and Research, Applied Research in Economic Development, Landscape Planning, Industrial Development, Economic Geography, and Growth & Change.


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Graphic Inventions

Tuesday October 11  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Graphic novels and comics have evolved as a serious literary form – subversive but somehow optimistic. If you’re thinking action heroes, think again.

Graphic illustrators Toby Morris and Sarah Laing discuss this powerful and wide-reaching way to communicate in the age of images, and explore the pleasures, dangers and moral consequences of fantasy.

SARAH LAING

Sarah Laing was born in Champaign-Urbana in 1973 to New Zealand parents and grew up in Palmerston North. The winner of the 2006 Sunday Star Times Short Story Competition, she went on to publish a collection of stories and two novels, most recently The Fall of Light.

She was awarded fellowships at the Michael King Writers' Centre, the Sargeson Centre and the University of Auckland. Also a graphic designer and illustrator, she’s contributed comics to magazines, illustrated children’s books, and co-edited Three Words: An Anthology of Aotearoa/NZ Women’s Comics. She lives in Wellington with her family. You can follow her blog: sarahelaing.com, or her Twitter and Instagram: @sarahelaing

TOBY MORRIS

Due to illness Dylan Horrocks is unable to attend the Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival. Toby Morris is now joining Sarah to bring his own style of graphic intervention.

Toby is an Auckland based illustrator, cartoonist and comic artist. He produces the regular non-fiction comic series The Pencilsword for The Wireless, and the drawing half of the Toby & Toby column for RNZ's website. His books Don’t Puke On Your Dad and Alledaags are autobiographical comics, focussing on small everyday moments.


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Word Murder

Wednesday October 12  -  19.00 - 20.00
Napier Century Theatre (MTG)
Adult   $15.00

From the Gutenberg Bible to Pokemon Go – what’s coming next? When Facebook claims that in five years’ time we’ll use images instead of text because the best way to tell stories and ‘digest information’ is by video, are we looking at the end of the written word? Novelist Charity Norman leads journalist Steve Braunias, and artist Freeman White as they boldly go where no human has gone before.

STEVE BRAUNIAS

Steve Braunias is the author of seven books, and is about to publish his latest book, THE SHOPS. It’s about the shops. It’s a photoessay in collaboration with Wellington photographer Peter Black. His previous books include The Scene of the Crime, the telling of 12 true-crime stories, and Civilisation, the telling of true stories of 12 obscure towns in New Zealand.

Steve is a journalist and satirist, and is currently a staff writer at the New Zealand Herald and literary editor of the Spinoff Review of Books online literary journal. He has previously worked for the Listener, Metro, and the Sunday Star-Times, He lives in Te Atatu, West Auckland, with his partner and their nine-year-old daughter. He is very familiar with Waipukurau.

CHARITY NORMAN

Charity Norman was born in Uganda, the seventh child of missionary parents, and brought up in draughty vicarages in Yorkshire and Birmingham. After several years’ travel she became a barrister in the Northeast of England, specialising in crime and family law. Also a mediator, she’s passionate about the power of communication to untie knots, and recently worked as a volunteer telephone listener with Lifeline.

She practised law for fifteen years but in 2002, realising that her three children had barely met her, she decided on a change of career and moved with her family to New Zealand. Novels include: Freeing Grace; Second Chances (After the Fall in UK), selected for Britain’s Richard & Judy Book Club; The Son-in-Law; and The Secret Life of Luke Livingstone, a BBC Radio 2 Book Club choice. Charity's books have been translated into several languages. Her fifth is due out in February next year.

FREEMAN WHITE

Freeman gained National recognition for his painting after winning the prestigious ADAM portrait awards back in 2006.

The artist has been published in several books most notably "New Zealand Portraits" by Richard Wolfe and "It's all about the Image" by Dick Frizzell. Freeman has paintings in the collection of the New Zealand Portrait Gallery including portraits of Jemaine Clement (Flight of the Concords) and Taika Waititi (Boy) which he painted for the cult NZ Film "What we do in the shadows".

(Please note, due to illness Dylan Horrocks is unable to attend the Harcourts Hawke's Bay Arts Festival).


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The Scene of the Crime

Thursday October 13  -  17.30 - 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

In everyday lives in ordinary streets, things can go horribly wrong. Moments of madness led to the notorious court cases of ordinary citizens like Mark Lundy, and Steve Braunias sat in on them. He joins Hamish Crafar to discuss his reports from the badlands and the strange psychologies of people who are criminals. Or not.

STEVE BRAUNIAS

Steve Braunias is the author of seven books, and is about to publish his latest book, THE SHOPS. It’s about the shops. It’s a photoessay in collaboration with Wellington photographer Peter Black. His previous books include The Scene of the Crime, the telling of 12 true-crime stories, and Civilisation, the telling of true stories of 12 obscure towns in New Zealand.

Steve is a journalist and satirist, and is currently a staff writer at the New Zealand Herald and literary editor of the Spinoff Review of Books online literary journal. He has previously worked for the Listener, Metro, and the Sunday Star-Times, He lives in Te Atatu, West Auckland, with his partner and their nine-year-old daughter. He is very familiar with Waipukurau.

HAMISH CRAFAR

Hamish Crafar is and has been the Head of English at Taradale High School for the last 16 years. His taste in literature is eclectic and ranges from Beowulf to Jo Randerson. Amongst other things he is a member of The Pukes, the second worst ukulele band in Hawke's Bay.




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Sidelined

Saturday October 15 11.00am - 12.00pm
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Back in the day, books aimed at a female audience were tagged ‘cozy’ ‘a beach read’ a ‘cardy read’.

Even today, books are likely to be marketed to female audiences as ‘romance’ or ‘chick-lit’, and to male audiences as a ‘thriller’. Are we diminishing great writing by forcing it into gender distinctions? Lizzie Russell leads international best selling authors Nalini Singh and Charity Norman in a discussion of historically annoying distinctions, along with their work and life experiences.

NALINI SINGH

Nalini Singh is the New York Times, USA Today, and internationally bestselling author of the Psy-Changeling, Guild Hunter, and Rock Kiss series. Born in Fiji and raised in New Zealand, she was first published in 2003. Her books have sold over six million copies worldwide and have been translated into more than twenty languages, including German, French, Japanese, and Turkish.

CHARITY NORMAN

Charity Norman was born in Uganda, the seventh child of missionary parents, and brought up in draughty vicarages in Yorkshire and Birmingham. After several years’ travel she became a barrister in the Northeast of England, specialising in crime and family law. Also a mediator, she’s passionate about the power of communication to untie knots, and recently worked as a volunteer telephone listener with Lifeline.

She practised law for fifteen years but in 2002, realising that her three children had barely met her, she decided on a change of career and moved with her family to New Zealand. Novels include: Freeing Grace; Second Chances (After the Fall in UK), selected for Britain’s Richard & Judy Book Club; The Son-in-Law; and The Secret Life of Luke Livingstone, a BBC Radio 2 Book Club choice. Charity's books have been translated into several languages. Her fifth is due out in February next year.

LIZZIE RUSSELL

Lizzie Russell works as BayBuzz magazine’s assistant editor and runs Tennyson Gallery in Napier. She also co-ordinates Pecha Kucha Hawke’s Bay and the biennial Wildflower Sculpture Exhibition. Lizzie holds an MA in Creative Writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters.


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Tangata Whenua: Writing New Zealand History

Saturday October 15  -  17.30 18.30
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Winner of multiple book awards, Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History charts the sweep of Māori history from ancient origins to the twenty-first century. Tryphena Cracknell leads a discussion with authors Professor Atholl Anderson and Dr Aroha Harris on the research underpinning it together with fellow historian and writer Dame Anne Salmond.

AROHA HARRIS

Dr Aroha Harris belongs to the iwi (tribes) Te Rarawa and Ngāpuhi. She is a senior lecturer in history at the University of Auckland, and member of the Waitangi Tribunal. Her most recent book was a collaboration with Emeritus Professor Atholl Anderson and the late Dame Professor Judith Binney – Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History (2014), a history of Māori from the ancient past until the present.

Aroha has a wide range of academic and applied historical research experience, including research for the negotiation and settlement of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. Her current research interests are iwi Māori histories of Māori policy and community development in the modern era.

ATHOLL ANDERSON

Atholl Anderson is an archaeologist and historian descended from Māori and Pakeha families of Foveaux Strait who has worked for more than 40 years across the Pacific and Indian Oceans, writing about pre-European voyaging and migration, the colonisation of islands, and the development of new societies with their impact upon island environments.

He is an Emeritus-Professor of the Australian National University who has written or edited 28 books and some 300 academic papers. His books on New Zealand include: Prodigious Birds: moas and moa-hunters in prehistoric New Zealand (Cambridge University Press 1989), The Welcome of Strangers: an ethnohistory of southern Māori, AD 1650-1850 (University of Otago Press, 1998), with Judith Binney and Aroha Harris, Tangata Whenua: an illustrated history (Bridget Williams Books, 2014) and most recently, The First Migration: Māori origins 3000BC-AD1450 (BWB Texts 2016). Atholl is currently the J.D. Stout Fellow at Victoria University of Wellington.

DAME ANNE SALMOND

2013 New Zealander of the Year Dame Anne Salmond, historian, anthropologist and author, walks in two worlds, and through her books has tried to bring greater understanding of the Māori experience and how it shapes us as New Zealanders. Her books include a South Pacific biography of William Bligh, a study of Māori ceremonial gatherings and the voyages of James Cook.

She is currently writing about cross-cultural exchanges in New Zealand, and Māori philosophy. Dame Anne has been elected a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy and a Foreign Associate of the National Academy of Sciences and in 2013 was awarded the Rutherford Medal.

TRYPHENA CRACKNELL
Te Iwi o Rongomaiwahine
Curator, historian, writer, teacher

Tryphena grew up in Hawke's Bay, attending William Colenso College before studying history at Victoria University, Wellington. She has lectured at EIT Hawke’s Bay and remains actively involved. Currently, Tryphena is Curator Taonga Māori at MTG Hawke’s Bay Museum. Her museum career started at Te Papa Tongarewa two decades ago. After taking a few years out of the sector to raise her sons and to teach in early childhood education, she started at MTG in 2010.

Tryphena is on the Museum's Aotearoa Board as a representative for Kāhui Kaitiaki: the network of Māori staff working in Aotearoa’s museums and galleries. Her most recent exhibition, Tēnei Tonu, was a finalist in the 2016 New Zealand Museum Awards. Her book, Momo kauae: Moko kauae in contemporary art was a finalist in the 2015 Ngā Kupu Ora Māori book awards.

She is currently researching the vibrant musical history of Hawke’s Bay iwi for an exhibition that opens at MTG in February 2017, He Manu Tīoriori.



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The Waters We Live In

Sunday October 16 11.00am - 12.00pm
Pacific Crystal Palace Spiegeltent
Adult   $15.00

Dame Anne Salmond is the patron of Te Awaroa: 1000 rivers, a riparian restoration project which aims to restore degraded waterways through networks made up of scientists, young people, farmers, iwi and other residents, local businesses and councils taking care of our rivers together. One of these projects is the Longbush restoration project in Gisborne. She will discuss the vexing issues of dams, clogged waterways, bottled water, and health of our waterways with Teina Moetara.

Teina Moetara is ahi-kaa-roa, connected intimately to his home community, marae, and to the Araiteuru River in Manutuke, Gisborne and is an advocate for the restoration of mauri ora to Te Arai River.

DAME ANNE SALMOND

Dame Anne Salmond is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Auckland and is one of New Zealand’s most prominent anthropologists and historians. Salmond is the author of several culturally significant books, including Two Worlds: First Meetings between Māori and Europeans, 1642–1772, Between Worlds: Early Exchanges between Māori and Europeans, 1773–1815, The Trial of the Cannibal Dog: Captain Cook in the South Seas, Aphrodite’s Island: The European Discovery of Tahiti, and her most recent 2011 publication, Bligh: William Bligh in the South Seas.

Salmond is also a committed environmentalist and has been involved in establishing the Longbush Ecological Trust, for the restoration of The Waikereru Ecosanctuary in Gisborne. The royalties for the New Zealand printing of Bligh: William Bligh in the South Seas have been donated to this charity.

She received the CBE for services to literature and the Māori people in 1988 and was made Dame Commander of the British Empire for services to New Zealand history in 1995. In 2009, she was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) for her excellence in scientific research. Salmond was honoured as the 2013 Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year.

TEINA MOETARA

Teina Moetara has been indirectly affected by Dame Anne’s influence all his life: Teina’s grandmother Bebe had her first job for Anne’s family, and his grandfather Darcy was a source for her research. Teina performed in the NZ Opera translated from Dame Anne’s Trial of the Cannibal Dog.